Big Time – The Documentary by Kaspar Astrup Schröder

November 15, 2017

 

“BIG TIME” opens in NY see times below:

DOC NYC

Wed, November 15th – 9.15pm – Cinépolis Chelsea 5

Thu, November 16th – 10.30am – IFC

December 1 @
Landmark at 57 West in New York for a week-long run.

 – get your tickets now.

https://www.landmarktheatres.com/new-york-city/the-landmark-at-57-west/

TRAILER:

On this podcast Monica speaks to danish director Kaspar Astrup Schröder who has followed the Danish star-architect over the course of five years. Most people know Bjarke Ingels for his work, but the film BIG TIME gets up and close to the person that is Bjarke Ingels.

 

ABOUT:

Bjarke Ingels started out as a young man dreaming of creating cartoons. Now, he has been named “one of architecture’s biggest stars” by The Wall Street Journal. BIG TIME follows Bjarke during th course of 5 years (2011-2016), while he struggles to finish his biggest project so far. We are let into Bjarke’s creative processes as well as the endless compromises that his work entails, and we are on the side when his personal life starts putting pressure on him, too. Bjarke Ingels’ company Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has been given the task of designing and building one of the skyscrapers, which will replace the Twin Towers, which collapsed on the 11th of September 2001 in Manhattan. While Bjarke is creating a building, which will change the New York skyline, he is hit by health-related issues. The Film offers an intimate look into the innovative and ambitious Danish architect, whom the entire world is celebrating as a genius.

DIRECTOR:

The director Kaspar Astrup Schröder describes the film and his work with Bjarke Ingels: “It has been a challenge to keep up with everything going on with Bjarke and his company. While doing so, I discovered how much pressure Bjarke was under. It was as if he had put himself in the driver’s seat in a train, which could never stop, and now he had to lay the tracks while managing the steering wheel. Then, some health-related issues arose, and the pressure became even bigger – that’s when I started feeling that the film had the potential of becoming even more universal. That it didn’t “only” have the potential of conveying interesting architecture as well as the fascinating brain behind all of it, but it could also paint the greater picture of the modern man and the choices, he has to make in order to find happiness. A picture of how the little things in life – close relations, love and health – might be more important than we presume.”

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